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AM5:00
thebest-memes:

"No matter how bad you fuck up at work, you didn’t fucked up this bad"

thebest-memes:

"No matter how bad you fuck up at work, you didn’t fucked up this bad"

aventureux-buveur-de-songes:

Will I ever get over Gnomon? ….No, probably no. Also I hate the background, I suck at backgrounds. Sorry.

aventureux-buveur-de-songes:

Will I ever get over Gnomon? ….No, probably no. Also I hate the background, I suck at backgrounds. Sorry.

stunningpicture:

Me (located in Iceland) and my friend (located in New Zealand) made the biggest sandwich of all time.

stunningpicture:

Me (located in Iceland) and my friend (located in New Zealand) made the biggest sandwich of all time.

wellthisisgr8:

cyberskateteam:

look how important this is

IT ME

wellthisisgr8:

cyberskateteam:

look how important this is

IT ME

uglyfoxybaby:

jonsnowflakes:

Collegehumors’ new video is on point as always

DYING !!

fleurdulys:

The Large Plane Trees (Road Menders at Saint-Rémy) - Vincent van Gogh
1889

fleurdulys:

The Large Plane Trees (Road Menders at Saint-Rémy) - Vincent van Gogh

1889

There seems to be this widely perceived notion that authors agree with everything they have their main protagonist say and do. I was just wondering if you knew where how this came about, seeing as you and hazel grace are so obviously the same exact person.
Anonymous

fishingboatproceeds:

Well, authors invite this—or at least authors like me do, by putting so much of our personal selves online and engaging in conversations outside stories, so it’s a little unfair to be like, “Follow me on tumblr and twitter and youtube and instagram, but NEVER TRY TO FIND MY INSIDE MY NOVELS.” As a reader, I find it impossible to ignore the author when they’re someone I know, whether online or off.

Also, we live in a quote culture: We see quotes all day across the Internet, and those quotes almost never come with real context. Like, the protagonist of Katherines says, “What’s the point of being alive if you don’t at least try to do something remarkable?” Now, I don’t think that’s a problematic approach to life, and I hope during the course of the novel Colin comes around to the idea that there’s great meaning and joy in the so-called unremarkable life. (As if anything on this planet overflowing with life is unremarkable.) But as I get older, I find myself less and less annoyed about the inevitable decontextualization that accompanies quotation. If people find something useful, okay. 

It’s so very hard to separate yourself as a person from your work, no matter what kind of work you do. (e.g.: As a high school student, I was disengaged and sloppy with occasional moments of promise, which to me meant that as a person I was disengaged and sloppy with moments of promise. But really, who you are in your job or education is not exactly who you are.) But I am not my work. It is up to other people, if they are so kind as to read and watch the stuff I make, to judge its quality and/or usefulness. The core things I am—a husband, a father, a brother, a son, a nerdfighter, a friend, etc.—are not dependent on my books being any good. Thank God for that.

I don’t think I answered your question. Sorry. The only answer I have to your question is that I believe books belong to their readers.

Happy birthday to me :)

annoying trivial problems:

the loop in my head right now is “ba ba ba ba barbara ann” or “get up ah get on up”. not the whole songs, just those lines. one of them will be repeating and repeating and repeating and when i’m about ready to tear out the part of my brain responsible for auditory processing it will switch to the other one and i’ll feel relief for half a second before the whole thing starts again.